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Transporting Customers

Transportation as a convenience for customers

Some businesses provide transportation for their customers as a convenience that supports their primary business. Examples include hotels that provide courtesy shuttle vans for guests going to or from an airport or tourist attractions that offer shuttle service to move visitors around the site or to and from parking lots. If you offer services like these must offer transportation to people with disabilities.

Equivalent service
A small hotel has hired a transportation company with a lift-equipped van.

If you provide transportation services on demand (for example, your hotel sends a van to the airport to pick up a customer when the customer calls), you can acquire vehicles that are equipped with a lift or you can contract with another company to provide accessible service for the customers who need it. For example, you might hire a local transportation company that has a lift-equipped van to transport your customer who uses a wheelchair.

The important thing to remember is that the service provided must be equivalent. If customers without disabilities can get transportation quickly and easily, people with disabilities deserve equivalent service. The services offered to people with disabilities must be as convenient as the services offered to other people in terms of fares, schedules or response times, hours of operation, pick-up and drop-off locations, and other measures of equivalent service.

Accessible vehicles
A larger hotel has purchased a lift-equipped bus; a guest using a scooter is using the lift.

The rules are slightly different for companies that provide courtesy transportation on a fixed route (for example, your hotel runs a shuttle bus continuously to and from an airport). In this case, all vehicles purchased or leased since 1992 with a capacity of over sixteen people must be equipped with a lift. Vehicles purchased or leased since 1992 with a smaller capacity must also be equipped with a lift, unless the company provides equivalent service as described above.

These rules apply to companies not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people.

Summary

  • If you provide transportation services to support their primary business, you must provide equivalent service for people with disabilities.
  • You can provide equivalent service by acquiring and operating accessible vehicles or by contracting with another company to provide accessible transportation services when needed.
  • The services offered to people with disabilities must be as convenient as the services offered to other people in terms of fares, schedules or response times, hours of operation, pick-up and drop-off locations, and other measures of equivalent service.